integrative – PushAsRx Athletic Training Centers El Paso, TX https://www.pushasrx.com Chiropractic Science & Functional Fitness Sat, 01 Feb 2020 03:08:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://i2.wp.com/www.pushasrx.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/IMG_8806_500_x_500.png?fit=32%2C32&ssl=1 integrative – PushAsRx Athletic Training Centers El Paso, TX https://www.pushasrx.com 32 32 111105572 Complementary/Alternative/Integrative Therapy for Back/Neck Pain https://www.pushasrx.com/complementary-alternative/ https://www.pushasrx.com/complementary-alternative/#respond Sat, 01 Feb 2020 03:08:23 +0000 https://www.pushasrx.com/?p=24619 11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 126 Complementary/Alternative/Integrative Therapy for Back/Neck Pain

More and more individuals are looking to add or try out complementary, alternative or integrative treatments for their back and neck pain. To help understand the differences as well as the similarities between the terms, try to remember: If an alternative clinic which means not mainstream is combined with a conventional clinic this is mainstream […]

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11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 126 Complementary/Alternative/Integrative Therapy for Back/Neck Pain

More and more individuals are looking to add or try out complementary, alternative or integrative treatments for their back and neck pain. To help understand the differences as well as the similarities between the terms, try to remember:

  1. If an alternative clinic which means not mainstream is combined with a conventional clinic this is mainstream medicine, then it is known as complementary or integrative health care.
  2. If it is used instead of or replaces conventional medical care, it is known as alternative health care.
  3. These terms complementary, alternative and integrative tend to get used interchangeably.
  4. The acronym C.A.M is sometimes used, which means Complementary Alternative Medicine.

 

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 126 Complementary/Alternative/Integrative Therapy for Back/Neck Pain

 

Choosing the right practitioner for your spine problem whether osteoarthritis, chronic back pain, or whiplash is just as important as choosing a medical physician or chiropractor.

You want to find an alternative or complementary/ integrative professional who is

  • Highly trained
  • Licensed
  • Experienced in treating your particular condition
  • Makes you feel comfortable
  • Takes time to answer all your questions

 

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 128 First Time Patients Want to Know About Chiropractic Benefits

Finding a Complementary Alternative Specialist

A good place to start is to ask your primary care physician, chiropractor for a referral. Others include:

Credentialing, licensing and certifying are terms you will find when learning about a particular complementary alternative medicine clinic or practitioner. Credentials can include the practitioner’s education, where and what they are allowed to practice. Certification in a particular field of practice like acupuncture, for example, is typically needed before the state issues a license and allows the professional to begin treating patients.

You can check your state’s mandatory licensure process for the type of complementary, alternative or integrative practitioner or clinic you are looking into. Most states require the practitioner to register their education, graduation, training, and continuing education credits. Your state agency can provide this information explaining what services the practitioner is allowed to provide such as the ability to provide dietary supplements.

 

11860 Vista Del Sol, Ste. 126 Complementary/Alternative/Integrative Therapy for Back/Neck Pain

Review the education and qualifications of all potential practitioners

Questions to think about when doing your research.

  • Practitioner’s education?
  • Did they graduate from a certified program/school?
  • Did they complete advanced training?
  • Are they a member of professional societies or organizations?
  • Do they regularly continue their training with up to date and advanced education?
  • How long have they been practicing?
  • Are the treatments covered by insurance?
  • Are they ready to work with your insurance provider?
  • What’s the cost of treatment if not covered by insurance?

Your Appointment Plan

Treatment or therapy that the complementary, alternative or integrative practitioner/clinic provides is considered non-medical.

These practitioners need your medical history, that includes over-the-counter and prescription medications, allergies, prior treatment like surgery/spinal injections along with vitamins/supplements you take. Additional information that could be needed is the contact information of your primary care physician or the doctor who referred you. Keep your primary physician/chiropractor informed about all treatments or therapies you will be receiving.


 

Low Back & Neck Pain Therapy


NCBI Resources

The spine is the primary support for the body. When it breaks down, the body suffers. Regular chiropractic treatment ensures that the spinal column remains in proper alignment which, in turn, keeps the body in proper alignment. It helps with joint health as well as the health of the related muscles and ligaments.

 

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An Integrative Holistic Approach To Migraine Headaches https://www.pushasrx.com/integrative-holistic-migraine-headaches/ https://www.pushasrx.com/integrative-holistic-migraine-headaches/#respond Wed, 24 Jan 2018 22:12:47 +0000 https://www.pushasrx.com/?p=15634 holistic

Holistic: Migraine headaches are typically debilitating, and require a comprehensive approach for successful treatment. It is helpful to consider migraine headache as a symptom of an underlying imbalance, rather than simply a diagnosis. A holistic approach is a satisfying way to think about and treat migraine headache. Physicians trained in this approach will consider a […]

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holistic

Holistic: Migraine headaches are typically debilitating, and require a comprehensive approach for successful treatment. It is helpful to consider migraine headache as a symptom of an underlying imbalance, rather than simply a diagnosis. A holistic approach is a satisfying way to think about and treat migraine headache. Physicians trained in this approach will consider a broad array of features that may contribute to the experience of migraine headache, including disturbances within the following key areas:

  • Nutrition
  • Digestion
  • Detoxification
  • Energy production
  • Endocrine function
  • Immune system function/inflammation
  • Structural function
  • Mind-body health

Migraine headache is an excellent example of biologic uniqueness; the underlying factors participating in each individual’s outcome may differ quite a bit from person to person. The journey of identifying and addressing these factors often results in an impressive improvement in frequency and intensity of the expression of migraine. Committed individuals will find the added benefit of better general health along the way.

Nutritional Considerations: Holisitic

Food Allergy/Intolerance

Numerous well-designed studies have demonstrated that detection and removal of foods not tolerated will greatly reduce or eliminate migraine manifestations. True allergy may not be associated with migraine in most individuals, but food intolerance is more common. Migraine frequency and intensity have been demonstrated to respond well to elimination diets, in which commonly offending foods are removed for several weeks. Elimination diets are easy to perform (although they do require a high degree of commitment and education), and can help in identifying foods that are mismatched to an individual. The majority of patients who undergo an elimination diet learn that their diets were contributing to chronic symptoms, and they typically feel much better during the elimination phase. Common foods that act as migraine triggers include: chocolate, cow’s milk, wheat/gluten grains, eggs, nuts, and corn. In children specifically, common migraine triggers include cheese, chocolate, citrus fruits, hot dogs, monosodium glutamate, aspartame, fatty foods, ice cream, caffeine withdrawal, and alcoholic drinks, especially red wine and beer.

There are several methods which may be used to detect food allergies. Laboratory testing can be convenient, but is not always a reliable means of detecting food intolerance. (See Summary of Recommendations for information on how to implement the elimination diet).

Foods such as chocolate, cheese, beer, and red wine are believed to cause migraine through the effect of “vasoactive amines” such as tyramine and beta-phenylethylamine. These foods also contain histamine. Individuals who are sensitive to dietary histamine seem to have lower levels of diamine oxidase, the vitamin B6-dependent enzyme that metabolizes histamine in the small bowel. The use of vitamin B6 improves histamine tolerance in some individuals, presumably by enhancing the activity of this enzyme.

Other diet-related triggers associated with migraine headache include: glucose/insulin imbalances, excessive salt intake, and lactose intolerance. Aspartame, commonly used as a sweetener, may also trigger migraines. Each of these factors may be readily avoided by adopting more conscious eating habits, and by carefully reading labels.

Magnesium

An estimated 75% of people consuming the standard American diet (SAD) are not getting adequate magnesium, and it is felt to represent one of the most common micronutrient deficiencies, manifested by a diverse range of problems. Though many elements can contribute to magnesium depletion, stress is among them, and both acute and chronic stress are associated with increased episodes of migraine. Daily doses of magnesium should be first line considerations for migraine sufferers (caution if kidney function is impaired), and intravenous magnesium can be very helpful in an emergency room setting, but probably only works to terminate an acute migraine if the individual is truly magnesium deficient.

Essential Fatty Acids

It is important to remember that the brain is largely composed of fat. Although essential fatty acids have not received much research attention relative to migraine, there may be a significant role of fatty acids and their metabolites in the pathogenesis of migraine headache. Two small placebo-controlled studies demonstrated that omega-3 fatty acids significantly outperformed placebo in reducing headache frequency and intensity. High quality fish oil should always be used. A good frame of reference is that each capsule should contain at least 300 mg of EPA and 200 mg of DHA. A reasonable starting dose would be two to four capsules twice daily with meals.

Digestive Function: Holistic

Holistic practitioners are generally sensitive to the centrality of the gastrointestinal tract in producing overall health. Though we utilize a reductionistic approach to understanding human anatomy and physiology, we might consider that no system functions as an independent entity (GI, endocrine, cardiovascular, immune, etc.), and that a complex symphony of interrelated functions cuts across organ systems. For example, much of the immune system is found in the Peyer’s patches of the GI tract; in this light, we can see how food, chemicals, and unhealthy microbes might produce immune system activation from gastrointestinal exposure. We also recognize the importance of a balanced ecosystem of intestinal microbes; intestinal dysbiosis, or disordering of the gastrointestinal ecology, may readily produce symptoms, both within and distant from the GI tract. Some colonic bacteria act upon dietary tyrosine to produce tyramine, a recognized migraine trigger for some individuals. H. pylori infection is a probable independent environmental risk factor for migraine without aura, especially in patients not genetically or hormonally susceptible. A high percentage of migraine patients experienced relief from migraines when H. Pylori infection was eradicated.

Detoxification: Holistic

Patients with migraine headache sometimes report that strong chemical odors such as tobacco smoke, gasoline, and perfumes may act as triggers. It is not uncommon for migraineurs to report that they are triggered by walking down the laundry soap aisle in the grocery store. Support for phase 1 and especially phase 2 detoxification may be beneficial for these individuals, as toxic overload or impaired enzymes of detoxification could theoretically be a significant mediator of headaches. Susceptibility to toxicity may be potentiated by a combination of excessive toxic exposures, genetic polymorphisms leading to inadequate detoxification enzyme production, or depletion of nutrient cofactors that drive phase two detoxification conjugation reactions Support for detoxification function is particularly important in modern life, given our exposure to unprecedented high levels of toxic chemicals. Some nutrients that supply support for detoxification function include: n-acetyl cysteine (NAC), alpha lipoic acid, silymarin (milk thistle), and many others.

Energy Production: Holistic

Riboflavin (Vitamin B2)

Energy production within the parts of the cell called mitochondria can be impaired in some migraine sufferers. Riboflavin is a key nutrient that is involved in energy production at this level. Riboflavin at 400 mg/day is an excellent therapeutic choice for migraine headache because it is well tolerated, inexpensive, and provides a protective effect from oxidative toxicity. Its use in children has been investigated, leading to similar conclusions,suggesting that, for pediatric and adolescent migraine prophylaxis, 200 mg per day was an adequate dose, but four months were necessary for optimal results.

Coenzyme Q10

CoenzymeQ10 (CoQ10) is also a critical component of energy function, and is an important antioxidant. Evidence supports the administration of CoQ10 in reducing the frequency of migraines by 61%. After three months of receiving 150 mg of CoQ10 at breakfast, the average number of headache days decreased from seven to three per month. Another study, using 100 mg of water soluble CoQ10 3x/day, revealed similar results. CoQ10 deficiency appears to be common in the pediatric and adolescent population, and can be an important therapeutic consideration in these age groups. Like riboflavin, CoQ10 is well tolerated (though expensive), with little risk of toxicity. It must be used with extreme caution in patients who also take warfarin, as CoQ10 may counteract the anticoagulation effects of warfarin. It is also noteworthy that many medications can interfere with CoQ10 activity, including statins, beta-blockers, and certain antidepressants and antipsychotics.

Endocrine (Hormone) Function

Female Hormones

It does not appear coincidental that migraine onset correlates with the onset of menstruation and that episodes are linked to menstruation in roughly 60% of female migraineurs. Although there is no universal agreement over the precise relationship between female hormones and migraine headache, it is apparent that the simultaneous fall of estrogen and progesterone levels before the period correlates with menstrual migraine. Estrogen gel used on the skin can reduce headaches when used premenstrually. Some researchers have found that continuous use of estrogen may be necessary to control menstrual migraines, which tend to be more severe, frequent, longer lasting, and debilitating than general migraines. Although published studies are lacking, many practitioners have used transdermal or other bioidentical forms of progesterone premenstrually with success. Of course, the risks of using hormones must be weighed against the benefits. Interestingly, administration of magnesium (360 mg/day) during second half of the menstrual cycle in 20 women with menstrually related migraines resulted in a significant decrease of headache days.

Melatonin

Melatonin, the next downstream metabolite of serotonin, is important in the pathogenesis of migraines. Decreased levels of plasma and urinary melatonin have been observed in migraine patients, and melatonin deficiency appears to increase risk for migraine. Melatonin has been used with some success, presumably via a restorative effect on circadian rhythms. A small study in children demonstrated significant improvement in their migraine or tension headache frequency with a 3 mg nightly dose of melatonin Melatonin appears to modulate inflammation, oxidation, and neurovascular regulation in the brain, and in one study, a dose of 3 mg/day was shown to be effective in reducing migraine headache frequency by at least 50% in 25 of 32 individuals. Ironically, some patients anecdotally report an increase of headaches (generally not migraine) when administered melatonin. The brains of migraineurs do not seem adaptable to extremes; a regular schedule of sleep and meals and avoidance of excessive stimulation are advisable to reduce excessive neural activation.

Immune Function/Inflammation: Holistic

Medications that produce an anti-inflammatory effect, such as aspirin and nonsteroidal agents, frequently produce an improvement in migraine symptoms during an acute attack. The herbs described below also play a role in reducing inflammation. Inflammation and oxidative stress can be identified in many conditions and disease states. It is important to acknowledge that the standard “modern” lifestyle is pro-inflammatory; our bodies are constantly reacting to one trigger after another (foods mismatched to our physiology, toxic burden, emotional stressors, excessive light and other stimulation) that activate our inflammatory cytokines (messengers of alarm). Providing broad-based support through lifestyle change and targeted nutrients may improve outcomes substantially, and this may be achieved foundationally by simplifying our ingestions/exposures and supporting metabolic terrain. Herbal therapies are included in this section because of their relevant effects upon inflammation.

Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium)

The precise mechanism of action of feverfew as a migraine preventive is unknown Though at least three studies found no benefit with feverfew, several controlled studies have revealed favorable results in improving headache frequency, severity, and vomiting when feverfew was compared to placebo. There are several caveats that should accompany the use of this herb:

  • Because of its anti-platelet effects, feverfew must be used with caution in patients on blood thinning products; avoid in patients on warfarin/Coumadin.
  • Feverfew does not have a role in managing acute migraine headache.
  • When withdrawing feverfew, do so with a slow taper, since rebound headache may occur.
  • Feverfew is not known to be safe during pregnancy and lactation.
  • Proceed with caution if an individual has an allergy to other members of the Asteraceae family (yarrow, chamomile, ragweed).
  • Most commonly reported adverse effects are oral ulceration (particularly for those chewing the leaves raw), and GI symptoms, reversible with discontinuation.

Feverfew is otherwise well tolerated. The typical dosage range is 25-100 mg 2x/day of encapsulated dried leaves with meals.

Butterbur (Petasites hybridus)

Butterbur is another effective herbal therapy for migraine headache. Butterbur is well tolerated, with no known interactions. Some individuals have reported diarrhea when using butterbur. In one study, its efficacy was demonstrated in children and adolescents between the ages of 6 and 17 years. Its safety is unknown during pregnancy and lactation. The plant’s pyrrolizidine alkaloids can toxic to the liver and carcinogenic, so only extracts that have specifically removed these compounds should be utilized. Many of the studies on Butterbur utilized the product Petadolex® because it is a standardized extract that has removed these alkaloids of concern. The usual dosage is 50 mg, standardized to 7.5 mg petasin and isopetasin, 2-3x/day with meals (although recent studies show that higher doses appear to be more effective1,2 ). Interestingly, butterbur’s diverse qualities make it useful for other conditions, including seasonal allergic rhinitis, and possibly painful menstrual cramps.

Ginger (Zingiber officinalis)

Ginger root is a commonly used botanical, known to suppress inflammation and platelet aggregation. Little clinical investigation has been performed relative to ginger use in migraine headache, but anecdotal reports and speculation based on its known properties make it a safe and appealing choice for migraine treatment. Some practitioners advise patients with acute migraine to sip a cup of warm ginger tea. Though evidence for this practice is lacking, it is a low-risk, pleasant, and relaxing intervention, and ginger is known to have anti-nausea effects. The most anti-inflammatory support is found in fresh preparations of ginger and in the oil.

Structural Considerations: Holistic

Practitioners of manual medicine seem to achieve success in reducing headache through various techniques such as spinal manipulation, massage, myofascial release, and craniosacral therapy Manual medicine practitioners frequently identify loss of mobility in the cervical and thoracic spine in migraineurs. While many forms of physical medicine seem helpful in shortening the duration and intensity of an episode of migraine, literature support is sparse with regard to manipulation as a modality to prevent recurrent migraine episodes. However, a randomized controlled trial of chiropractic spinal manipulation performed in 2000 revealed a significant improvement in migraine frequency, duration, disability, and medication use in 83 treatment group participants. Tension headache may also respond favorably to these techniques because of the structural component involved in muscular tension. The incidence of migraine in patients with TMJ dysfunction is similar to that in the general population, whereas the incidence of tension headache in patients with TMJ dysfunction is much higher than in the general population. Craniosacral therapy is a very gentle manipulative technique that may also be safely attempted with migraine.

Mind-Body Health: Holistic

There are few things more insulting than to be told by a medical professional to “Just reduce your stress.” Though the total load of stress experienced by an individual can be reduced through paring down unnecessary obligations, many everyday life stressors are unavoidable and cannot be simply eradicated. Thus, the answer to reducing stress for unavoidable contributors lies in two important areas: enhancing physical and mental resilience to stress, and modifying the emotional response to stress.

A multitude of programs to reduce the impact of stress on our physical and emotional well-being are rapidly becoming mainstream. For example, mindfulness meditation programs by Jon KabatZinn, PhD and many others are being offered to communities by hospitals around the country. This technique is simple to perform and has demonstrated positive outcomes in heart disease, chronic pain, psoriasis, hypertension, anxiety, and headaches. Breathwork and guided imagery techniques are likewise effective in producing a relaxation response and helping patients to feel more empowered about their health.

Biofeedback and relaxation training have been used with mixed success for migraine headache. Thermal biofeedback uses the temperature of the hands to help the individual learn that inducing the relaxation response will raise hand temperature and facilitate other positive physiologic changes in the body. Learning how to take more active control over the body may reduce headache frequency and severity. The effectiveness of biofeedback and relaxation training in reducing the frequency and severity of migraine headaches has been the subject of dozens of clinical studies, revealing that these techniques can be as effective as medication for headache prevention, without the adverse effects. Other relevant modalities to consider in this light include cognitive behavioral therapy, neurolinguistic programming, hypnosis, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and laser therapy.

Exercise should not be overlooked as a modality helpful in migraine headache. Thirty-six patients with migraine who exercised 3x/week for 30 minutes over six weeks experienced significant improvement in headache outcomes. Pre-exercise beta-endorphin levels in these individuals were inversely proportional to the degree of improvement in their post-exercise headache parameters. All patients should understand the critical importance of exercise on general health.

Acupuncture: Holistic

A discussion about a holistic integrative approach to migraine headache would be incomplete without acupuncture, which is an effective treatment modality for acute and recurrent migraine. A qualified/licensed practitioner of Traditional Chinese Medicine or a physician trained in medical acupuncture should be consulted.

Holistic: Summary Of Recommendations

  • Since initiators of migraine headache may be cumulative, identify and avoid them when possible. Consider the basic areas of dysfunction bulleted on the first page of this syllabus.
  • The incidence of food intolerance is high in patients with migraine headache; consider a comprehensive elimination diet for four to six weeks, during which time the following foods are eliminated: dairy products, gluten-containing grains, eggs, peanuts, coffee/black tea, soft drinks, alcohol, chocolate, corn, soy, citrus fruits, shellfish, and all processed foods. Careful reintroduction of one food at a time, no more often than every 48 hours, may help identify a food culprit. Meticulous recording of foods reintroduced is necessary. Most patients feel improved vitality during the elimination phase. Foods that clearly produce migraine (or other) symptoms should be avoided or used on a rotation schedule of not more than once every four days. If multiple foods introduced back into the diet seem to produce migraine headache, consider the possibility of altered intestinal permeability (leaky gut syndrome).
  • Consider the following supplements (Consult a qualified practitioner for advice):
  • Magnesium glycinate: 200-800 mg/day in divided doses (decrease to tolerance if diarrhea occurs)
  • Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine): 50-75 mg/day, balanced with B complex o 5-HTP: 100-300 mg 2x/day, with or without food, if clinically appropriate
  • Vitamin B2 (riboflavin): 400 mg/day, balanced with B complex
  • Coenzyme Q10: 150 mg/day
  • Consider hormonal therapies
  • Trial of melatonin: 0.3-3 mg at bedtime
  • Trial of progesterone or estradiol, carefully individualized, under medical supervision.
  • Botanical medicines
  • Feverfew: 25-100 mg 2x/day with meals
  • Butterbur: 50 mg 2-3x/day with meals
  • Ginger root
  • Fresh ginger, approximately 10 gm/day (6 mm slice)
  • Dried ginger, 500 mg 4x/day
  • Extract standardized to contain 20% gingerol and shogaol; 100-200 mg 3x/day for prevention, and 200 mg every 2 hours (up to 6 x/day) for acute migraine
  • Manual medicine may be helpful for some individuals.
  • Acupuncture
  • Mind-body support
  • Thermal biofeedback
  • Read The Relaxation Response by Herbert Benson, MD
  • Mindfulness meditation programs
  • Centering prayer
  • Breathwork
  • Guided imagery
  • Yoga, tai chi, qi gong, etc.
  • Many other modalities to consider!

Conclusion: Holistic Medicine

Patients will often request a more natural and self directed approach to health care. The recommendations above are typically very safe to implement, and are often welcomed by migraine sufferers. A practitioner with an integrative holistic focus will investigate an extensive array of predisposing factors to determine the underlying features most likely involved in a given individual’s condition. In this way, we treat the individual, rather than his or her diagnosis, and we will generate a favorable impact upon his/her overall health in the process.

Chiropractic Care & Headaches

©American Board of Integrative Holistic Medicine. All rights reserved.

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https://www.pushasrx.com/integrative-holistic-migraine-headaches/feed/ 0 An Integrative Holistic Approach To Migraine Headaches | PUSHasRx ® El Paso, TX. Migraine headaches are typically debilitating, and require a comprehensive approach for successful treatment. It is helpful to consider migraine headache as a symptom of an underlying imbalance. A holistic approach is a satisfying way to think about and treat migraine headache. headaches,holistic,integrative,medicine,migraine,holistic 15634
Genetic Testing In Integrative And Functional Medicine https://www.pushasrx.com/genetic-integrative-functional-medicine/ https://www.pushasrx.com/genetic-integrative-functional-medicine/#respond Fri, 10 Nov 2017 00:37:36 +0000 http://www.pushasrx.com/?p=15046 heart

Genetic: Integrative and functional medicine came to the forefront for many medical practitioners and patients alike when they became dissatisfied with traditional medicine’s sole focus on what was considered “science-based” treatment approaches. Traditional medicine’s viewpoint of dealing with symptoms in isolation from the rest of a patient’s body, mind, and spirit can be too confining […]

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heart

Genetic: Integrative and functional medicine came to the forefront for many medical practitioners and patients alike when they

1-genetic-testing-integrative-and-functional-medicine-32570

became dissatisfied with traditional medicine’s sole focus on what was considered “science-based” treatment approaches. Traditional medicine’s viewpoint of dealing with symptoms in isolation from the rest of a patient’s body, mind, and spirit can be too confining when it comes to certain conditions.

This evolution to a more function-centered approach as opposed to a disease-centered way of seeing the whole person has led to improved healthcare. It also looks at prevention, not simply illness and at living in a healthy state, not simply disease-free.

What Is Integrative & Functional Medicine?

Practitioners of integrative and functional medicine take into consideration genetic, environmental, and lifestyle issues when listening to their patients describe the symptoms plaguing them. Their inclusion of these issues makes the process more of a natural medicine approach.

With the dramatic increase in chronic illness conditions and the lack of training traditional physicians have in dealing with these conditions, the move into integrative and functional medicine is needed.

Many of these chronic illness conditions have a genetic component that, along with environmental and lifestyle factors, lead to serious limitations on people’s lives. This shows the importance of the individual biochemical and genetic aspects of each person on his or her health.

This other approach in medicine realizes the necessity of considering nutrition, exercise, diet, and genetics in evaluating and remediating chronic illness conditions. The use of genetic testing in integrative and functional medicine is one way to take all of these factors into account.

SNPs & Integrative & Functional Medicine

Upon completion of the mapping of the human genome, we know there are 20-25,000 genes in each genome. With this knowledge came the information that there are over 80 million variants in the human genome.

These variants are comprised in part of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and deletions or insertions in the genome. It is these SNPs that provide significant health information to providers of integrative and functional medicine to prevent or alleviate chronic illness conditions.

Knowing the presence of and placement of SNPs through genetic point mutation testing allows evaluation of the susceptibility to develop many of the chronic illness conditions that affect people today. In addition, this kind of testing helps pinpoint relevant SNPs and their corresponding metabolic markers in individuals.

Testing of this kind provides targeted interventions through the use of traditional medicine approaches as well as supplementation through integrative and functional medicine approaches. Monitoring of individuals’ progress is also made easier with genetic testing by measuring metabolic markers found in the original tests over a period of time.

Individual monitoring of this type is necessary when this kind of personalized intervention and supplementation is used. If there is an overload of either medications or supplementations, there can be an impact on the performance of metabolic processes that can lead to side effects. These side effects can influence functions and responses, such as the immune response.

Individual SNPs will determine how well medications and supplements are working.

Genetic Testing In Relation To Diet & Weight Loss

Integrative and functional medicine practitioners not only deal with illness, they also provide health and wellness evaluations. Current research has shown how important a role genetics plays in the prevention of many chronic health conditions.

Genetic testing can show vulnerabilities to conditions and suggest options for individuals. This kind of testing can also provide valuable information concerning how individuals can respond to different attempts to live more healthy lives.

Genetic testing has been shown to be effective in several areas: diet, eating behavior traits, nutritional needs, exercise, body and weight, and metabolic health. For each of these areas, there are certain genetic markers that can provide information regarding how genetics will affect each of these areas.

Diet

2-weight-obsession-integrative-and-functional-medicine-32570People are seemingly obsessed with weight. How to lose it and keep it off, how to re-distribute it to look more attractive. Professionals in integrative and functional medicine are approached regularly for help in this area.

Everyone knows it’s hard for some people to lose weight on any kind of diet, while others can lose weight any time they want. It’s not just due to lack of willpower that people don’t lose the weight they want. It may also be due to genetics.

Research has shown about 88 percent of people have bodies that resist burning fat through low-intensity exercise. Most people will gain weight if they eat almost any carbs (about 45 percent of people) or almost any fat (about 39 percent of people).

The reason for this is a diet and type of exercise matched to specific genotype lead to weight loss. These diets and exercise types are not the same for everyone.

For example, let’s look at adrenoceptor Beta 3 (ADRB3) with an SNP on rs4994. There are different variations of this gene. If you are either an AA or TT genotype, you have what is called a genetic privilege and just about any kind of exercise will work for you. On the other hand, if you don’t have either of these AA or TT genotypes, this is a genetic disprivilege and only a high-intensity type exercise will help you lose weight.

Further analysis of other genes and SNPs can tell you the type of diet, either low carb or low fat, that will work best for you. In fact, using a diet matched to your genetics can result in a loss of two and half times as much weight as a diet not matched to genetics.

In addition to choosing the right diet to lose weight, choosing the right diet may also help you avoid developing a chronic health condition. Research has shown diet to be implicated in many chronic illness conditions, so genetic testing to determine your specific vulnerability to illnesses and your response to particular foods may help prevent them.

Knowing your predisposition to illnesses can lead to targeted dietary and lifestyle changes that may modify any existing conditions and help prevent future developments. Future research may bring more information regarding bioavailable components in foods that can aid in alleviating health issues.

COMT & CYP19 Genes

3-dna-test-integrative-and-functional-medicine-32570Research has identified certain genes that work together and appear to show that some people retain fat regardless of, or in spite of, exercise.

In one study, researchers found two genes, COMT and CYP19 that appeared to be involved in patterns of fat loss and exercise. Having one CYP19 gene and variants of that gene did not affect fat, intra-abdominal fat, or total fat. However, having two of these genes seemed to be related to slightly more decrease in body mass index and significantly more decrease in total fat and percentage of body fat.

The researchers also found that having one genotype of the COMT gene and one copy of the CYP19 gene seemed related to significant loss of BMI, total fat, and percentage of body fat.

Why and how these genes and combinations work isn’t known yet. More research is needed to determine this. Other research suggests women with a specific CYP19 variant may also have increased levels of estradiol and estrone which may make it harder for them to lose fat through exercise.

Environmental Factors

Weight loss or gain is not solely at the mercy of your genetics however. A combination of genetics and environment is likely behind your success or failure regarding your weight loss attempts.

The thinking of professionals is divided on the subject of genetics versus environment/lifestyle choices. One set of these professionals regards environment to be the telling component. They point to the teaching over the years that food is a reward for good performance at anything. This, combined with constant reminders about food that are around us all the time, makes it hard for some people to lose weight and/or keep it off.

Others believe losing weight and keeping it off are more related to biological functions. They have found people to be metabolically different after losing up to ten percent of their body weight. Their brains also seem to respond to food differently. The emotional response to food is greater, but the brain regions that deal with food restraint are less active. This sets up the person to regain the weight lost.

Further research into why people lose weight and maintain that loss will be needed. Some of that research has to be on the genetic basis of weight loss.

Eating Behavior

4-diet-study-integrative-and-functional-medicine-32570Integrative and functional medicine practitioners view eating behavior as important for overall health. These behaviors include snacking behavior, feelings of satiety, craving for sweets, desire for food or certain foods, and the disinhibition of eating.

Nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics are two new fields of study related to how genes affect our diet and how our diet affects genes, respectively. Obesity, cancer, and heart disease are three of the health conditions most investigated in these two new fields.

One study involving these new fields showed the bitter taste gene receptor hTAS2R38 to be involved in tasting glucosinolates, found in some fruits and vegetables. Three genotypes in this gene receptor have been identified: PAV/PAV, PAV/AVI, and AVI/AVI.

Those individuals with PAV/PAV are said to be supertasters. They are very sensitive to bitter tastes in some foods and in some man-made compounds used in research. People with PAV/AVI are considered medium tasters. They can taste bitter in the research compounds, but not as much as the supertasters. Individuals with AVI/AVI are labeled non-tasters. They don’t taste bitter in the research compounds.

While it’s difficult to completely understand why these differences occur, it does appear they can make a difference in people’s diets. It could be that people who taste bitter greatly or somewhat will avoid certain vegetables that contain this bitter taste. Vegetables like kale and broccoli have this taste.

In this way, genetics have a significant influence on eating behavior.

5-kale-integrative-and-functional-medicine-32570Research indicates taste is only one of the ways genetics affects eating behavior. Caloric intake, meal size, and frequency of eating also appear to be affected. People’s desire for fats, carbohydrates, or proteins also may be influenced by genetics.

Research has found apolipoprotein A-II (APOA2) to be implicated in this kind of desire. Three variants in this gene, TT, TC, and CC, have been isolated as factors affecting the choice of fats, carbs, and proteins. One study showed both men and women who had the recessive CC chose more fat and protein and fewer carbs than either of the T alleles. The CC group ate about 200 more calories than the other group and tended to develop obesity more frequently.

It appears that APOA2 may affect not only food choices but also feelings of satiety.

Nontasters seem to prefer and seek out fats and flavors, so dieting may be more difficult for them to stick with and lose weight. Supertasters, on the other hand, enjoy a variety of foods, especially those that are spicy and robust. This may help them with diets.

Understanding the factors that appear to influence eating behaviors has gained importance with the tremendous increase in obesity in the U.S. and around the world, along with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Eating behavior must be seen as a complex inter-relationship among psychological, cultural, physical, and genetic factors that influence the choice of foods, the amount of food intake, caloric intake, and timing of meals.

Regulating Eating Behavior

Clearly, taste affects food choices as seen in the discussion above. Another of the bitter receptors, TAS2R5, may also assist in regulating eating behavior. Alcohol dependence has been associated with an SNP in this receptor, along with another receptor, TAS2R16. These research findings seem to indicate variants in the TAS2R gene to be associated with ingestive behavior.

Genetic influence over meal amounts, how often people eat, and the timing of meals is a new area of study and may involve digestive neuroendocrine hormones such as CCK, leptin, and ghrelin. Studies are underway investigating the effects of these hormones on pathways that influence eating behavior.

A gene with a strong association with the risk of obesity, FTO, appears to contribute to obesity by downregulating leptin production in adipocytes. Adiposity and satiety appear to be associated with a fairly common variant, rs9939609. One study showed the A allele of rs9939609 to influence post-meal feelings of satiety and possibly to influence the excess caloric intake seen in men and women with high BMIs.

A gene involved in the detoxification of nutrients during digestion, AKR1B10, also appears to play a role in influencing human eating behavior.

Nutritional Needs & Genetic Testing

Another area in which integrative and functional medicine practitioners use genetic testing is in determining nutritional needs of their patients. As we have seen previously, genetic variants have an effect on taste and thus on nutrition. When people choose foods that “fit” their tastes but are short on nutrients, their health suffers. People also appear to have genetic responses to some supplements, such as some of the B vitamins and vitamin C.

The impact of nutrition is a lifetime factor, and practitioners of integrative and functional medicine evaluate nutritional needs closely. Any genetic variant that leads to abnormal nutritional requirements would likely be incompatible with survival. For example, miscarriage is more likely in a woman whose fetus has two alleles that negatively affect the use of any given nutrient than a woman whose fetus just has the common functional variants.

Several studies have isolated genes and alleles that affect nutrients and their utilization. For example, an SNP (Ala222Val) in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene leads to a significant alteration in folate metabolism, increasing the risk of neural tube defects (NTDs) and cardiovascular disease, but lowering the risk of colon cancer. Increasing folate intake lowers the risks of developing serious health conditions.

Research has found other SNPs that alter homocysteine metabolism and folate uptake and transport. SNPs in enzymes that affect utilization and metabolism of vitamin B12 seem to be associated with NTDs and the possible development of Down syndrome and colon cancer.

SNPs in the vitamin D receptor may be associated with asthma in both children and adults. Lipid pathways, alcohol metabolism, and lactose metabolism appear to be affected by SNPs in other genes, also. A beneficial effect of these SNPs in the ancestors of certain ethnic groups or ancestral subpopulations may have been present, even though they tend to carry the risk of an adverse outcome today.

Environmental changes have been shown to bring a previously silent allele into a role as a disease allele. The aldolase B enzyme metabolizes fructose and was silent even with a high number of polymorphisms. In recent times, when fructose was added to foods as a sweetener, the polymorphisms began presenting as disease alleles.

Integrative and functional medicine professionals can use this information to guide their patients into more healthy lives.

Genetic Testing & Exercise

6-fitness-test-integrative-and-functional-medicine-32570Integrative and functional medicine also uses genetic testing to determine the best types of exercise for different people and to explore the likelihood of injuries of several kinds in athletes. This latter area of research and clinical practice can help reduce the number and severity of athletic injuries for adult and child athletes.

While there have been some gene variants associated with athletic ability, none have been shown to be predictive to any degree. Research in this area is promising for decreasing serious injury in young athletes. But to date, little scientific information regarding a genetic variation in young athletes is available.

Genetic testing as a way of choosing which athlete to select for a particular sport is increasing. However, little evidence has been found to show it is more accurate than traditional ways of selecting candidates. The ethics of this kind of testing for young athletes has been brought into question.

ACE Genes

Two genes and the SNPs associated with them have been examined in several population samples and thus have robust findings. The ACE I/D polymorphism was first found to be associated with human performance several years ago. This gene is part of the renin-angiotensin system that controls blood pressure through its effect on the regulation of body fluid levels.

The ACE I allele lowers ACE activity in serum and tissue. The D allele increases ACE activity in serum and tissue. The ACE I/I genotype has been shown over and over again to indicate performance endurance and greater efficiency in exercise. The ACE DD genotype has been shown to indicate strength and power performance levels.

This ACE I/D genotype does not appear to have predictive ability in Kenyan athletes, suggesting the confounding influence of ethnicity or geography.

ACTN3 Gene

7-endurance-athletes-integrative-and-functional-medicine-32570The ACTN3 is strongly associated with the protein alpha-actinin-3. This protein is involved exclusively in fast type II muscle fibers that are used in explosive activities. SNP R577X indicates a stop codon at position 577 rather than an arginine (R). An R allele puts athletes at an advantage in power sports. A study of the ACTN3 R577X variant in elite European athletes showed those in power event to be 50 percent less likely to have the XX variant and those involved in endurance events to be 1.88 times more likely to have the XX variant. For world-class endurance athletes, the odds of having the XX variant were 3.7 times larger when compared with lower-level athletes. It appears the ACTN3 gene is more important at the upper levels of sports.

While research shows the effects of the ACTN3 gene on athletic performance, especially in higher class athletes, the effects in the general population were negligible. It is unclear just what the association of this gene in the general population and choice of athletic activities in this population might be.

Resistance to injury and the ability to recover from injuries are also very important factors not only in professional sports but also for the general population. The emphasis on physical activity currently seen in the culture increases the risk of injury and the need for information regarding recovery.

Concussions and tendinopathies have been studied fairly extensively. Information on these two growing areas of injury among young athletes has been valuable for integrative and functional medicine specialists.

These two areas are important due to the long-lasting effects of both on young athletes. Research and clinical practice have shown the effects of concussion to linger into old age where they can increase the cognitive decline normally seen at that time of life.

APOE4 Gene

A better understanding of the genetic aspects of injury and recovery can help practitioners of integrative and functional medicine to both protect those young athletes at risk for injury and to better treat those who suffer injuries.

Regarding concussion, the gene most studied is APOE and its three alleles. The APOE e4 allele has been implicated in the development of Alzheimer’s Disease. This allele has been studied recently to determine its association, if any, with concussion risk and outcomes of traumatic brain injury. To date, the results are not clear.

Some findings have shown people with the e4 allele to have less favorable outcomes from traumatic brain injuries and boxers with this allele had higher chronic brain injury scores. These findings are consistent with e4 being a risk allele. However, one study of college athletes with the e4 allele did not find them to be more likely to suffer a concussion. Another study showed the e4 allele was not associated with poorer head trauma outcomes in children.

Another APOE variant, G-219T, has been linked with increased risk of concussion in athletes. Those athletes with the TT genotype compared to those with the GG genotype had a risk of concussion three times larger. A weak association was found in that same study between the tSer53Pro polymorphism in MAPT, the tau-protein encoding gene, and risk of concussion.

Collagen Genes, Integrative &Functional Medicine

Collagen is the primary component of tendons and ligaments, thus it is connected very closely with research into tendinopathies. It is no surprise that two variants in genes coding for collagen (COL1A1 and COL5A1) have been shown to suggest increased risk of injury to tendons. MMP3, a gene associated with connective tissue wound repair and the gene encoding TNC, an extracellular matrix protein, have also been implicated in increased risk of tendinopathies.

These are preliminary studies that need replication and further study to validate the findings.

Genetic Testing & Metabolic Health

8-cardiovascular-integrative-and-functional-medicine-32570Metabolic syndrome and metabolic health have been studied extensively due to metabolic syndrome being a major risk factor for the development of diabetes mellitus 1 and cardiovascular disease. Genetic and environmental factors interrelate in a complex fashion to bring about this condition. A cluster of metabolic abnormalities, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, and impaired glucose tolerance make up metabolic syndrome.

All of the components of metabolic syndrome are highly heritable. Studies have shown links between metabolic syndrome and genes such as PPARg, adiponectin, CD36, and beta receptors.

There has been a considerable investigation into the heritability of metabolic syndrome. One study involved over 2,200 individuals in over 500 family groups. It was the first to identify major genes influencing metabolic syndrome.

Chromosome 3q27 was significantly linked to six factors involved in metabolic syndrome: weight, leptin, insulin, waist circumference, hip circumference, and insulin/glucose ratio. Chromosome 17p12 was strongly linked to plasma leptin levels.

Another study evaluated over 200 SNPs in 110 genes for their effects on coronary artery disease, highly implicated in metabolic syndrome. SNPs in eight of these genes showed association with metabolic syndrome: LDLR, GBE1, IL1R1, TGFB1, IL6, COL5A2, SELE and LIPC.

These genes are described below:

  • LDLR: Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor gene. It is strongly involved in the homeostasis of cholesterol. Hypercholesterolemia in families has been linked to mutations of this gene.
  • GBE1: Glycogen Branching Enzyme gene. It is involved in coding the glycogen branching enzyme which aids in glycogen synthesis. Branching of these chains allows a great number of glycosyl units to be stored in a molecule of glycogen.
  • IL1R1: Interleukin 1 Receptor, Type 1. Interleukin 1 is made up of two proteins, IL1-alpha and IL1-beta, and is a mediator of inflammation.
  • TGFB1: Transforming Growth Factor, Beta 1. This gene encodes the peptide involved in many functions in cells. Apoptosis may result due to dysregulation of the activation of this gene.
  • IL6: Interleukin 6 gene. It is a cytokine that regulates the immune response by activating a cell surface signaling assembly. Its production by neoplastic cells has been implicated in the growth of a number of cancers.
  • COL5A2: Collagen, Type V, Alpha 2. Mutations in the gene may bring on weakened connective tissue throughout the body.
    SELE: Selectin E gene. May be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

Some of the more common inherited metabolic conditions include:

  • Lysosomal storage disorders. These can result in the buildup of toxic substances inside lysosomes in the cells.
  • Glycogen storage conditions. Sugar storage problems can lead to weakness, low blood sugar, and muscle pain.
  • Mitochondrial disorders: Can lead to muscle damage.
  • Peroxisomal disorders: Can lead to a buildup of toxic products of metabolism.
  • Metal metabolism disorders: Special proteins control levels of trace metals in the blood. A malfunction in these proteins caused by genetic metabolism disorders can lead to toxic levels of metals in the body.

Symptoms of genetic metabolism disorders include:

  • Low energy levels
  • Decreased appetite
  • Abdominal pain
  • Weight loss
  • Jaundice
  • Seizures

From this list of symptoms, it’s easy to see the relationship of metabolic syndrome and adrenal fatigue. Practitioners of integrative and functional medicine will be faced with patients who present with adrenal fatigue and these similar symptoms. This makes it important for them to understand at least the basics behind Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome (AFS).

Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome

9-lethargy-integrative-and-functional-medicine-32570Feelings of fatigue and lethargy are presented more and more frequently in health care professionals’ offices. Combined with concentration difficulties, sleep problems, inability to lose weight, feeling your brain is in a fog, fatigue, and lethargy may point to AFS as the basic issue.

AFS is a constellation of many nonspecific symptoms that can become debilitating. The onset of the symptoms is slow and can be missed by traditionally trained professionals.

The symptoms of AFS result from the body’s normal response to stress from any source. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is set into motion, releasing hormones and other chemicals that are designed to deal with stress. At the end of the axis are the adrenal glands that secrete cortisol, the stress fighting hormone. The purpose of this hormone is to limit the effects of stress on the body.

In normal circumstances, once the stress ceases, the cortisol levels decline and the adrenals get a chance to recover. However, in our stress-filled culture, the stresses continue. This puts the demand on the adrenals at an extreme level. At some point, the adrenals are no longer able to secrete cortisol, which results in damage to the body from the effects of stress.

Levels of inflammation and an increased immune response results. Inflammation has been implicated in many chronic illness conditions. It is at this point that the body begins breaking down from the accumulation of symptoms such as fatigue, brain fog, insulin resistance, and increasing inflammation.

NeuroEndoMetabolic (NEM) Response

The traditional medical viewpoint of addressing individual symptoms and/or organs when working to alleviate illness conditions is simply too mechanistic. A more comprehensive viewpoint is needed in order to effectively deal with symptoms of AFS. The NEM model is such a viewpoint.

The model says it is important to consider organ systems operating in an interrelationship in which whatever affects one organ system affects others as well. In this regard, it is in line with the integrative and functional medicine viewpoint.

The NEM model is a functional approach that looks at interactions between the individual’s environment and the gastrointestinal, endocrine, and metabolic organ systems, among others. This allows a healthcare practitioner to find the root causes, triggers, immediate causes, and genetic factors involved in a person’s illness condition.

This is a much more comprehensive approach to alleviating people’s symptoms and illness conditions.

10-endocrine-integrative-and-functional-medicine-32570Increasing and unrelenting stress is a part of our culture that is detrimental to the health of every individual. The metabolic component of the NEM model added to the neuroendocrine aspect helps professionals to see how localized organ-specific responses and systemic responses are necessary for successfully dealing with stress.

The metabolic component of our stress response is very subtle in the early stages. But the derangements of our metabolism worsen as time goes on and stress doesn’t stop. By the time the stress response reaches stage 3 or 4, these derangements can become debilitating. At the severe stage, they can lead to hypersensitivity to supplements and to paradoxical reactions.

Very significant and debilitating symptoms begin arising. Often, these lead the person to be bed-ridden due to their severity.

AFS & Genetics

A question integrative and functional medicine experts and those who suffer from AFS all want to know is: Can you inherit AFS?

Before answering that question, you need to understand even if you have a gene or several genes that are involved in a health condition like AFS, it doesn’t mean you will automatically get that condition. Before genes can do anything, either positive or negative, to your health, they have to get the signal to “switch on.”

One good thing about that signal is you have quite a bit of control over it. Scientists and researchers have discovered environment, choices you can make, exert significant control over whether genes are turned on or off. This is called gene expression.

Can you choose to switch specific genes on or off? That’s beyond us at this point. What you can do is make good lifestyle choices, good exercise choices, good diet choices and either activate or de-activate genes in this way. Genetic testing as seen in integrative and functional medicine practices is a way to determine your choices in many areas. Which diet works best for you and what exercises will best benefit you can be answered through this kind of testing.

Answering the specific question posed above, ‘Can you inherit AFS?’, is a complicated process.

Two genes with significant involvement in this answer are MTHFR and COMT. Both are involved with methylfolate. People with mutations in MTHFR don’t have enough methylfolate leading to less adrenaline because of interference in the methylation process. Methylation aids in the production of adrenaline and other hormones.

The other gene, COMT, is involved in the production of hormones and chemicals in the body. Low levels of methylfolate with this gene leads to lower levels of epinephrine and higher levels of norepinephrine.

The lack of methylfolate with both of these genes, especially MTHFR, leads to feelings of fatigue.

When your body is stricken by stress, both your adrenals and MTHFR are affected. This leads to the fatigue felt by those of you who suffer from AFS. The enzyme that produces dopamine and serotonin is also dependent on methylation to work right. Low levels of methylfolate can lead to low levels of both of these neurochemicals which can then lead to low energy and fatigue.

What Can You Do To Improve Energy Levels?

There are some things you can do to aid in increasing energy and improving the work of the two genes mentioned, MTHFR and COMT.

Balance your blood sugar levels by eating three or four small meals per day. These meals should include good grains like quinoa or rice, good carbs, and vegetables. You can add protein from fish or free-range chicken.

Supplements can help support your adrenal glands and the methylation process also. Vitamin B1, B2, and B6 will help. There are usually no side effects from vitamin B1, but if you should begin feeling any itching, notice any rashes, or have trouble breathing, contact your healthcare professional immediately.

Side effects from B2 are also rare. Very yellow urine will be seen, but this is not serious. If you do have any rashes, breathing trouble, or itching, contact your physician at once.

Taken in large doses for a long time, B6 can cause side effects. Headache, nausea, and drowsiness are enough to contact your healthcare professional at once.

Some people try taking methylfolate (5-MTHF), but this is a labor-intensive effort and could bring on some serious side effects if your body is not ready for it. If your body gets overwhelmed by the 5-MTHF, you can feel headaches, irritability, anxiety, and heart palpitations. Get medical help right away for these side effects.

Despite advance testing, it is important to remember that tests are simply data points of alert. A clinical decision should be made after a detailed consideration of the history and state of the body. A shotgun approach to treating abnormal laboratory values is a common clinical mistake and can lead to negative clinical outcomes.

Conclusion

11-genome-mapping-integrative-and-functional-medicine-32570The mapping of the human genome has provided an opportunity for researchers and clinicians alike to consider the roles genes play in health and wellness. Discovering the presence and effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has increased not only our knowledge of how genes affect health, but also has given us tools to use in preventing and remediating many chronic illness conditions.

Integrative and functional medicine practitioners have been among the professionals to use this information in a practical sense. Whether AFS can be inherited is yet to be seen. Clinically, we do see a strong correlation from one generation to the next.

Genetic testing to examine the working of MTHFR and COMT may be of some help. Diet and supplements can also increase your chances of these two genes working correctly and alleviating some of the symptoms of AFS.

Because genetic testing is still in the very early phase of development, it is important to take all data points with the right perspective and refrain from treating abnormal laboratory numbers while the root cause of the problem can be masked.

read more button© Copyright 2017 Michael Lam, M.D. All Rights Reserved.

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The Effectiveness of Integrative and Functional Nutrition Programs https://www.pushasrx.com/the-effectiveness-of-integrative-and-functional-nutrition-programs/ https://www.pushasrx.com/the-effectiveness-of-integrative-and-functional-nutrition-programs/#respond Mon, 09 Oct 2017 20:23:00 +0000 http://www.pushasrx.com/?p=14836

Research suggests that illness recovery and prevention improve when supported by proper nutrition and supplementation. Nevertheless, clinicians don't often get extensive training in nutrition and nutrient supplements in osteopathic and medical school, a study of pediatric residency interns that were incoming showed.

 

What's the importance of nutrition towards health and wellness?

 

Unsurprisingly, many patients are malnourished, are experiencing record levels of disease, and therefore are likely being treated without learning about other, less invasive but exceptionally effective treatment options.

 

The Power of Nutrition

 

When high-quality nutrition is used consistently and efficiently, it may prevent potential chronic disease, enhance cognition in people with dementia, and improve outcomes in patients getting GI and colorectal oncological surgeries, to mention a few. In addition, nutrition support is associated with length of s

The post The Effectiveness of Integrative and Functional Nutrition Programs appeared first on PushAsRx Athletic Training Centers El Paso, TX.

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Research suggests that illness recovery and prevention improve when supported by proper nutrition and supplementation. Nevertheless, clinicians don’t often get extensive training in nutrition and nutrient supplements in osteopathic and medical school, a study of pediatric residency interns that were incoming showed.

 

What’s the importance of nutrition towards health and wellness?

 

Unsurprisingly, many patients are malnourished, are experiencing record levels of disease, and therefore are likely being treated without learning about other, less invasive but exceptionally effective treatment options.

 

The Power of Nutrition

 

When high-quality nutrition is used consistently and efficiently, it may prevent potential chronic disease, enhance cognition in people with dementia, and improve outcomes in patients getting GI and colorectal oncological surgeries, to mention a few. In addition, nutrition support is associated with length of stays and infectious complications.

 

Integrative and functional medicine practitioners, specialists of any discipline certified in integrative and functional medicine, are educated healthcare providers, qualified and experienced on how best to use functional nutrition to effectively prevent and even reverse chronic illness, such as fibromyalgia, as well as to support general health and wellness. Functional nutrition aims at addressing the imbalances in the body by restoring proper function through food, lifestyle and supplement interventions, restoring a patients’ health and improving the patients’ outcomes.

 

To get started learning about functional nutrition, many healthcare professionals learn the basics of the way functional nutrition helps their patients through an extended series of specialized courses and training. Some integrative and functional medicine resources may contains over 10 food programs which could be personalized depending on the individual condition and the patient, to provide a personalized treatment experience.

 

When Standard Diets Don’t Work

 

Despite recent improvements in nutrigenomics, the thought that a given food is going to have precisely the same impact for all individuals is still widespread. A recent study found that after ingesting identical foods, blood sugar levels could vary by up to 20 percent in the exact same person and up to 25 percent across individuals.

 

Likewise, another study demonstrated that individuals may have radically different sugar responses to the exact same meal. Using continuous glucose monitoring and meals that were standardized, the investigators found that identical meals led to physiologic outcomes. As a result, any strategy that grades dietary components either “good” or “poor” based on their typical postprandial glycemic responses (PPGRs) will be of small use to the respective patient.

 

In contrast, the exciting and relatively new field of metabolomics is now being applied in nutrigenomics research. Because the molecules which vary between meals are identified by metabolomics, researchers guess it could be utilized to determine biomarkers of disease risk and also to track effects of foods for more efficient treatment.

 

In an era in which more personalized data is accessible than ever before, healthcare professionals can attain incredible outcomes by using this emerging study to evaluate and treat patients according to their individual needs. But how do you develop a framework for customizing therapy programs that takes into consideration all data that is applicable?

 

The Institute for Functional Medicine’s foundational five-day course, Applying Functional Medicine in Clinical Practice (AFMCP), for example, joins practitioners to personalized tests and clinical instruments which can be tailored to each individual’s particular physiology, including genetics, lifestyle, and readiness to change. A variety of specialized integrative and functional medicine training programs provides healthcare professionals the tools to prescribe effective treatment programs customized to individual patients’ needs across the spectrum.

 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal injuries and conditions. To discuss options on the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900
 

By Dr. Alex Jimenez

 

Additional Topics: Wellness

 

Overall health and wellness are essential towards maintaining the proper mental and physical balance in the body. From eating a balanced nutrition as well as exercising and participating in physical activities, to sleeping a healthy amount of time on a regular basis, following the best health and wellness tips can ultimately help maintain overall well-being. Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables can go a long way towards helping people become healthy.

blog picture of cartoon paperboy big news

 

TRENDING TOPIC: EXTRA EXTRA: About Chiropractic

 

 

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https://www.pushasrx.com/the-effectiveness-of-integrative-and-functional-nutrition-programs/feed/ 0 The Effectiveness of Integrative and Functional Nutrition Programs | PushAsRx Athletic Training Centers El Paso, TX | Research suggests that illness recovery and prevention improve when supported by proper nutrition and supplementation. Nevertheless, clinicians don't often get extensive training in nutrition and nutrient supplements in osteopathic and medical school, a study of pediatric residency interns that were incoming showed.   What's the importance of nutrition towards health and wellness?   Unsurprisingly, many patients are malnourished, are experiencing record levels of disease, and therefore are likely being treated without learning about other, less invasive but exceptionally effective treatment options.   The Power of Nutrition   When high-quality nutrition is used consistently and efficiently, it may prevent potential chronic disease, enhance cognition in people with dementia, and improve outcomes in patients getting GI and colorectal oncological surgeries, to mention a few. In addition, nutrition support is associated with length of s dralexjimenez,Functional Medicine,health,integrative,nutrition,wellness blog picture of cartoon paperboy big news 14836