PUSH Fitness & Rehabiliation
Welcome !! PUSH-as-Rx ®™ is leading the field with laser focus supporting our youth sport programs. The PUSH-as-Rx ®™ System is a sport specific athletic program designed by a strength-agility coach and physiology doctor with a combined 40 years of experience working with extreme athletes. At its core, the program is the multidisciplinary study of reactive agility, body mechanics and extreme motion dynamics. Through continuous and detailed assessments of the athletes in motion and while under direct supervised stress loads, a clear quantitative picture of body dynamics emerges. Exposure to the biomechanical vulnerabilities are presented to our team. Immediately, we adjust our methods for our athletes in order to optimize performance. This highly adaptive system with continual dynamic adjustments has helped many of our athletes come back faster, stronger, and ready post injury while safely minimizing recovery times. Results demonstrate clear improved agility, speed, decreased reaction time with greatly improved postural-torque mechanics. PUSH-as-Rx ®™ offers specialized extreme performance enhancements to our athletes no matter the age.

Subway Chicken May Contain Just 50% Chicken

By now you may have heard the shocking news: Subway’s “chicken” may contain just 50 percent chicken. The rest is filler, according to a report published by Time Magazine.

According to tests performed at Trent University in Canada, the company’s chicken strips and oven-roasted chicken contained just 43 percent and 54 percent chicken DNA, respectively, consisting otherwise of soy and other filler ingredients.

Subway denies the charges and has demanded a retraction from CBC Marketplace, yet admits it is “concerned by the alleged findings.” According to Subway, its chicken strips and oven-roasted chicken contain less than 1 percent soy protein.

The filler, it turns out, is a very long list of ingredients, however, a majority of it is soy protein. John Coupland, president of the Institute of Food Technologists, told Time Magazine.

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“Based on the data, that is a surprisingly large amount of soy … And it’s astonishingly high for something that you’re supposed to think is a real, whole piece of chicken.”

On average, fast food chicken contains about one-quarter less protein than home-cooked chicken breast, thanks to water infusions and fillers, and up to eight times more sodium.

Moreover, as noted in the program, while you’d never expect chicken to be a source of carbohydrates, fast food chicken, such as that from Subway, contain surprisingly high amounts of refined starches and sugars.

Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C.,C.C.S.T’s insight:

A published report revealed that Subway’s chicken may not entirely be what the consumer is expecting. In fact, the article stated that only about 50 percent of the chicken served in Subway is real, whole chicken while the other 50 percent has been described as filler. For more information, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at (915) 850-0900.

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