PUSH Fitness & Rehabiliation
Welcome !! PUSH-as-Rx ®™ is leading the field with laser focus supporting our youth sport programs. The PUSH-as-Rx ®™ System is a sport specific athletic program designed by a strength-agility coach and physiology doctor with a combined 40 years of experience working with extreme athletes. At its core, the program is the multidisciplinary study of reactive agility, body mechanics and extreme motion dynamics. Through continuous and detailed assessments of the athletes in motion and while under direct supervised stress loads, a clear quantitative picture of body dynamics emerges. Exposure to the biomechanical vulnerabilities are presented to our team. Immediately, we adjust our methods for our athletes in order to optimize performance. This highly adaptive system with continual dynamic adjustments has helped many of our athletes come back faster, stronger, and ready post injury while safely minimizing recovery times. Results demonstrate clear improved agility, speed, decreased reaction time with greatly improved postural-torque mechanics. PUSH-as-Rx ®™ offers specialized extreme performance enhancements to our athletes no matter the age.

Active or Passive Recovery: Which is Better?

Training doesn’t make us fitter – recovery from training does. So, how do we recover? An easy jog or spin, or a lazy day on the sofa, asks Beate Stindt, chartered physiotherapist at Six Physio.

​Recovery can be either active or passive. Passive recovery is just that; total rest. A passive recovery day should not include any training. On these days you should rest and recover, which means no spring cleaning and no walking around the shops for the whole day.

An active recovery session usually involves your usual sport, be it running, swimming, cycling or yoga, but at an easy to moderate intensity. Active recovery has been likened to a short nap – the aim is to feel better at the end of your workout than you did at the beginning. Training for an event places a huge amount of stress on your body and hard sessions result in the hormone cortisol being released. Cortisol is a natural anti-inflammatory but, left to hang around in the blood for too long, can negatively interfere with muscle regeneration.

Active vs Passive Recovery

One aim of active recovery is to clear the metabolic waste resulting from exercise, as well as providing a higher level of blood flow to muscles in need of nutrients, allowing them to repair themselves.

While there is not yet conclusive evidence showing whether or not this really does result in quicker recovery, if you are going to try it, it’s important that it’s done correctly so as not to contribute to fatigue. Many athletes will use an active recovery session as a technical workout and focus on form and technique, something they might not be able to do during sessions with a higher intensity where technique work can be drowned out.

Some athletes will have a recovery workout in between two hard workouts while others may include a recovery week in their training programme. A general rule of thumb for a recovery week/session would be to reduce the volume of your training by approximately 30 per cent. If you train according to heart rate, make sure you complete your session at less than 60 per cent of your maximum heart rate. If you need a break from all technology, as a general rule you should make sure you can still continue a conversation. You should be able to speak in full sentences and not only the odd word or grunt.

Another way to make sure that you are not working too hard is to make sure you are comfortable breathing through your nose (make sure all nasal passages are clear!).

So which is best? The jury is still out. Like so many things in training, everyone has their own personal preference and it is important to find your own and do it correctly. If you’re going to include active recovery sessions as a part of your training, resign yourself to the fact that you might not get admiring looks from passers by or that you might be overtaken by your elderly neighbor on her bicycle with a fully laden basket. But remember: that’s okay!

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal injuries and conditions. To discuss options on the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .

Additional Topics: Chiropractic and Athletic Performance

Although warm-up stretches, exercise and plenty of training activities are practiced on a regular basis to prevent injuries, many athletes frequently experience sports injuries during their specific physical activity and/or sport. Fortunately, chiropractic care can help treat and rehabilitate athletes, in order for them to return to the field as soon as possible. Chiropractic has also been demonstrated to help increase athletic performance.

 

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